You're inside their thoughts

I'm Tumblr user psychicdaydreams. Pleasure to meet you. My pronouns are they/them.
Ask me stuff here. Find out about this nerd here.

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

thefinespine:

do you ever capitalize a certain -usually casual- Word for that right amount of emphasis

WORD is too loud, word is too sneaky or quite, and word is direly important

but Word feels scientific and calm, like the word in and of itself is what’s important

Soooo tired of cis people spouting faux medical BS to complain about trans people wanting to feel safe and comfortable going to the doctor.

There should be cis-people-complaining-about-trans-healthcare bingo.

“In the United States, access to tampons and pads for low-income women is a real problem, too: food stamps don’t cover feminine hygiene products, so some women resort to selling their food stamps in order to pay for “luxuries” like tampons. Women in prison often don’t have access to sanitary products at all, and the high cost of a product that half the population needs multiple times a day, every month for approximately 30 years, is simply, well, bullshit.”

- The case for free tampons (via stuffmomnevertoldyou)

You know, I don’t think I’ve ever heard anybody suggest that toilet paper or paper towels in public bathrooms shouldn’t be free.  We’d consider it outrageous if that very basic necessity were to be missing, or provided only for purchase.

And yet.

(via animatedamerican)

kagesora:

chekhovandowl:

This is something that was bugging me a little bit so, as always, I’ve decided to make an infograph. 

Maybe other artists disagree, but when I ask for a request, it’s a fun game. You give me a suggestion and I build on it. It’s a team project. You don’t know what you’re going to get.

If your request takes longer than 3 sentences to describe, it’s not a request. It’s a commission. It’s something so specific, the artist will essentially be working for your specific scene for free.

And of course - DO NOT REQUEST THAT AN ARTIST DRAW YOU SOMETHING if you don’t see that they are specifically accepting requests.

People have been requesting free art from us our whole lives. We’ve had plenty of that. If we want to draw you free stuff, we’ll let ya know. Don’t just assume we have free time - just like you wouldn’t come up to a doctor at a grocery store and ask them to examine your twisted ankle.

Unless you’re a person who does that… in which case… don’t do that either.

I’d like to remind people that this goes for writing requests, too.

And if an artist or writer has a list of “what I do/don’t do” then please respect that.

cardozzza asked: Hi, FYWH! I'm writing a thing, and the story centers around two queer women. I've been frustrated that all the LGBT+ books I could find centered around tropes like 'everything that happens is because you're gay!' or 'your family will abandon you!'. Are there any other tropes I should be aware of?

fixyourwritinghabits:

There are a few other common ones that you probably know of, but I’ll go ahead and list out:

The Villainous Gay/Murderous Trans Person/Violent Bisexual - This all stems from the same idea - there is something inherently wrong with being queer, and that will manifest in terrible ways. It’s also taking advantage of ‘gay panic’ and the fear of gay people being attracted to straight people by translating that fear into murder and violent actions.

Curing the Lesbian  - This is one thing that only, only happens to women who like women - the idea that lesbians can be ‘cured’  of only liking women by that one special guy’s dick, always through sex, always changing them to like men instead of realizing they are bisexual. It goes hand-in-hand with the narrative that women who are lesbians just have something against men, that their attraction isn’t legitimate.

The Gay Best Friend/Sidekick - The GBF you know - he’s the one who knows all about fashion and is a great listener to his straight girl friends, and that’s the only role he serves. There’s a whole movie about this. The Sidekick is more common in books that are trying to do better, but to me they still have a lot of the same problems - they are a secondary character who is the single person not straight, and that takes up much of their personality and purpose.

While there are more (and people are welcome to add their own), your basic safety net is ensuring that your characters are people first, and their sexuality does not drive all of their actions, motivations, or personality. See Also:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

wertheyouth:

When an undercover officer saw Monica Jones, a black transgender woman, walking down the street just a few blocks from her house, in an area that the officer described as being “known for prostitution,” that was enough to convince him that she intended to engage in prostitution. It was on that basis that he approached and stopped her.
In April of this year, Monica was convicted of violating this overbroad and vague law. Today she appeals that conviction, and the ACLU, along with other advocacy and civil rights organizations, filed a brief in support of her appeal.
We #StandWithMonica because transgender women of color should be able to walk down the street in their neighborhoods without being arrested, or worse, for simply being themselves.
When Walking Down the Street is a Crime. Chase Strangio, ACLU

wertheyouth:

When an undercover officer saw Monica Jones, a black transgender woman, walking down the street just a few blocks from her house, in an area that the officer described as being “known for prostitution,” that was enough to convince him that she intended to engage in prostitution. It was on that basis that he approached and stopped her.

In April of this year, Monica was convicted of violating this overbroad and vague law. Today she appeals that conviction, and the ACLU, along with other advocacy and civil rights organizations, filed a brief in support of her appeal.

We #StandWithMonica because transgender women of color should be able to walk down the street in their neighborhoods without being arrested, or worse, for simply being themselves.

When Walking Down the Street is a Crime. Chase Strangio, ACLU

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

upholsterers:

Reblog if gender dysphoria is not the same thing as being self conscious/having low self esteem. I’m trying to prove a point to my mother who may not let me transition because she thinks i just need to “accept my self and my flaws.”